The following information has been extracted from our CHEMINFO database, which also contains hazard control and regulatory information. [More about...] [Sample Record]

Access the complete CHEMINFO database by contacting CCOHS Client Services.

 
SECTION 1. CHEMICAL IDENTIFICATION

CHEMINFO Record Number: 463
CCOHS Chemical Name: Tetrahydrofuran

Synonyms:
Diethylene oxide
Tetramethylene oxide
THF
1,4-Epoxybutane
Butylene oxide
Cyclotetramethylene oxide
Furanidine
Hydrofuran
Oxacyclopentane

Chemical Name French: Tétrahydrofuranne
Chemical Name Spanish: Tetrahidrofurano
CAS Registry Number: 109-99-9
UN/NA Number(s): 2056
RTECS Number(s): LU5950000
EU EINECS/ELINCS Number: 203-726-8
Chemical Family: Saturated cyclic aliphatic ether / cyclic monoether / hydrofuran
Molecular Formula: C4-H8-O
Structural Formula: -CH2-CH2-CH2-CH2-O- (5-membered ring)

SECTION 2. DESCRIPTION

Appearance and Odour:
Clear, colourless liquid with an ether-like odour

Odour Threshold:
7.3-10.2 mg/m3 (2.48-3.47 ppm) (recognition); 180 mg/m3 (61.2 ppm) (distinct odour) (12)

Warning Properties:
GOOD - May be detectable by odour below one tenth of the TLV.

Composition/Purity:
Commercially available at a purity of 99% or greater. May contain inhibitors/stabilizers such as p-cresol (0.05-1.0%), hydroquinone (0.05-1%), 4,4-thiobis(6-tert-butyl-m-cresol) (up to 0.1%). During prolonged storage, uninhibited tetrahydrofuran may form peroxides, if exposed to air. (9)

Uses and Occurrences:
Solvent for resins, coatings, adhesives, magnetic tapes, printing inks, Grignard reactions, lithium aluminum hydride reductions and polymerizations; chemical intermediate; preservative for histological samples.


SECTION 3. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION

EMERGENCY OVERVIEW:
Clear, colourless liquid with an ethereal odour. EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE LIQUID AND VAPOUR. May accumulate static charge by flow or agitation. Vapour is heavier than air and may spread long distances. Distant ignition and flashback are possible. After prolonged storage, uninhibited THF can form explosive peroxides. Mild central nervous system depressant. High vapour concentrations may cause headache, nausea, dizziness, drowsiness and confusion. Causes eye irritation.



POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS

Effects of Short-Term (Acute) Exposure

Inhalation:
Tetrahydrofuran is a central nervous system depressant. At lower concentrations, tetrahydrofuran can cause headaches and can irritate the nose and throat.(6) Tetrahydrofuran is anesthetic (causes loss of sensation and loss of consciousness) at high concentrations (25000 ppm) and also causes decreased blood pressure and strong respiratory stimulation.(6)
A concentration of 25000 ppm was reported lethal to humans (duration of exposure not given).(1)

Skin Contact:
Liquid tetrahydrofuran applied to the skin of 196 persons was found to be essentially non-irritating.(5) One unconfirmed test with rabbits indicates that tetrahydrofuran may be irritating to the skin.

Eye Contact:
Liquid tetrahydrofuran is moderate to severe eye irritant, based animal information. High concentrations of tetrahydrofuran vapours (5000 ppm) can be irritating to the eyes.(7)

Ingestion:
Tetrahydrofuran is probably not very toxic, based on animal test data. Ingestion is not a typical route of occupational exposure.

Effects of Long-Term (Chronic) Exposure

No toxic effects from industrial use were located.(8)

Skin:
Prolonged or repeated exposure to tetrahydrofuran may dry out the skin, causing dermatitis.

Carcinogenicity:

No human information was located. In a National Toxicology Program (NTP) test, clear evidence of carcinogenicity was documented in female mice and some evidence of carcinogenicity in male rats, both with unknown relevance to humans.(26,28)

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has not evaluated the carcinogenicity of this chemical.

The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) has designated this chemical as an animal carcinogen (A3).

The US National Toxicology Program (NTP) has not listed this chemical in its report on carcinogens.

Teratogenicity and Embryotoxicity:
No human information was located. In animal studies, developmental effects have not been observed in the absence of maternal toxicity.

Reproductive Toxicity:
No human information was located. No effects on fertility or reproduction were observed in a two-generation animal study.

Mutagenicity:
No human information was located. Negative results were obtained in tests using live animals, cultured mammalian cells, bacteria and fruit flies.

Toxicologically Synergistic Materials:
Information not available

Potential for Accumulation:
Probably does not accumulate. Animal studies indicate that tetrahydrofuran is broken down readily in the body.(4)


SECTION 4. FIRST AID MEASURES

Inhalation:
This product is flammable. Take proper precautions (e.g. remove any sources of ignition). If symptoms are experienced, remove source of contamination or move victim to fresh air. If breathing has stopped, trained personnel should begin artificial respiration (AR) or, if the heart has stopped, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) immediately. Obtain medical attention immediately.

Skin Contact:
As quickly as possible, flush contaminated area with lukewarm, gently running water for at least 5 minutes, or until the chemical is removed. If irritation persists, obtain medical advice immediately. Completely decontaminate clothing before re-use or discard.

Eye Contact:
Immediately flush the contaminated eye(s) with lukewarm, gently flowing water for at least 20 minutes, or until the chemical is removed, while holding the eyelid(s) open. Take care not to rinse contaminated water into the unaffected eye or onto the face. Obtain medical attention immediately.

Ingestion:
If irritation or discomfort occur, obtain medical advice immediately.

First Aid Comments:
Consult a doctor and/or the nearest Poison Control Centre for all exposures except minor instances of inhalation or skin contact.
All first aid procedures should be periodically reviewed by a doctor familiar with the material and its conditions of use in the workplace.



SECTION 5. FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES

Flash Point:
-17 deg C (1 deg F) (closed cup) (9,18); a value of -14.4 deg C (6 deg F) (probably closed cup) (10) has also been reported.

Lower Flammable (Explosive) Limit (LFL/LEL):
1.8% (9); 2% (10)

Upper Flammable (Explosive) Limit (UFL/UEL):
11.8% (9,10)

Autoignition (Ignition) Temperature:
321 deg C (610 deg F) (10); 224 deg C (435 deg F) (9)

Sensitivity to Mechanical Impact:
Pure THF is probably not sensitive to impact. THF contaminated with high concentrations of peroxides may explode on impact.

Sensitivity to Static Charge:
In general, aliphatic ethers can accumulate static charge by flow or agitation. THF vapour can be readily ignited by static discharge.

Fire Hazard Summary:
Extremely flammable. Material will readily ignite at room temperature. Vapour can accumulate in confined spaces. Vapour is heavier than air and may travel a considerable distance to a source of ignition and flash back to a leak or open container. During prolonged storage, forms thermally explosive peroxides in the presence of air and in the absence of inhibitors. Closed containers containing peroxides may rupture violently in the heat of fire.

Extinguishing Media:
Small fires: Dry chemical powder or carbon dioxide Large fires: Alcohol resistant foam

Fire Fighting Instructions:
Tetrahydrofuran (THF) is very soluble in water and has a very low flash point. Evacuate area and fight fire from a safe distance or protected location. Approach fire from upwind to avoid hazardous vapours and toxic decomposition products. Move container(s) from fire area if it can be done without risk. Water may be ineffective for fighting fires involving THF because of its low flash point, unless used under favourable conditions by experienced fire fighters trained in fighting all types of flammable liquid fires. However, water may be used to dilute the liquid to the point where it is no longer flammable.
Also, water may be used in the form of spray or mist to absorb heat. Keep containers cool and protect exposed material. If a leak or spill has not ignited, use water spray to disperse the vapours and to protect personnel attempting to stop a leak. Water spray may be used to flush spills away from ignition sources.
THF is hazardous to health. Firefighters may enter the area if positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus (NIOSH approved or equivalent) and full Bunker Gear is worn.



NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION (NFPA) HAZARD IDENTIFICATION

NFPA - Health: 2 - Intense or continued (but not chronic) exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury.
NFPA - Flammability: 3 - Liquids and solids that can be ignited under almost all ambient temperature conditions.
NFPA - Instability: 1 - Normally stable, but can become unstable at elevated temperatures and pressures, or may react vigorously, but non-violently with water.

SECTION 9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

Molecular Weight: 72.10

Conversion Factor:
1 ppm = 2.9 mg/m3; 1 mg/m3 = 0.34 ppm at 25 deg C

Physical State: Liquid
Melting Point: -108.5 deg C (-163 deg F) (7)
Boiling Point: 66 deg C (151 deg F) (7)
Relative Density (Specific Gravity): 0.8892 at 20 deg C (water = 1) (7)
Solubility in Water: Very soluble (30% in water at 25 deg C) (7)
Solubility in Other Liquids: Soluble in all proportions in alcohols, ketones, esters, ethers and hydrocarbons.(7)
Coefficient of Oil/Water Distribution (Partition Coefficient): Log P(oct) = 0.46 (7)
pH Value: Not available. Probably neutral.
Vapour Density: 2.49 (air = 1)
Vapour Pressure: 17.5 kPa (131.5 mm Hg) at 20 deg C.(7,12) Also reported as 19.3 kPa (145 mm Hg) at 20 deg C.(10)
Saturation Vapour Concentration: 17.3% at 20 deg C; 19.1% at 20 deg C (calculated).
Evaporation Rate: 8 (butyl acetate = 1) (7)
Critical Temperature: 267 deg C (513 deg F) (7)

Other Physical Properties:
CRITICAL PRESSURE: 5188 kPa (51.2 atm) (7)


SECTION 10. STABILITY AND REACTIVITY

Stability:
THF is normally stable if properly inhibited. During long-term storage, uninhibited THF may form peroxides in the presence of air. Exposure to light can accelerate peroxide formation. THF containing peroxides may explode when the peroxides are concentrated by evaporation or distillation.(9)

Hazardous Polymerization:
Does not occur

Incompatibility - Materials to Avoid:

NOTE: Chemical reactions that could result in a hazardous situation (e.g. generation of flammable or toxic chemicals, fire or detonation) are listed here. Many of these reactions can be done safely if specific control measures (e.g. cooling of the reaction) are in place. Although not intended to be complete, an overview of important reactions involving common chemicals is provided to assist in the development of safe work practices.


STRONG OXIDIZING AGENTS - Increased risk of fire and explosion.

BROMINE - Addition of Br2 to tetrahydrofuran causes vigorous reaction with gas evolution, possibly photobromination of tetrahydrofuran.(9)

CAUSTIC ALKALIES - Any peroxides in the product can react violently with alkalies.(9)

Hazardous Decomposition Products:
Tetrahydrofuran can form peroxides when exposed to air.

Conditions to Avoid:
Static discharge, friction, sparks, open flame, air, light.

Corrosivity to Metals:
Non-corrosive

Stability and Reactivity Comments:
See reference 9 for a description of methods used to destroy any peroxides formed in THF.
THF will attack some forms of plastics, rubber, and coatings.(7)


SECTION 11. TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

LC50 (rat): 18200 ppm (4-hour exposure); cited as 21000 ppm (3-hour exposure); (1, unconfirmed)

LD50 (oral, rat): 1650 mg/kg (1, unconfirmed)
LD50 (oral, guinea pig): 2300 mg/kg (1, unconfirmed)

Eye Irritation:

Tetrahydrofuran is a moderate to severe eye irritant.

In a modified Draize test, application of 0.1 mL of tetrahydrofuran, with no wash for 24 hours, produced moderate eye irritation in rabbits (maximum average score: 31.2/110).(20) Application of 0.1 mL of tetrahydrofuran produced corneal opacity in 6/6; iritis in 6/6; conjunctival redness in 6/6 and conjunctival swelling in 5/6 rabbits. An additional reading of the eyes was made at 14 days. Severe, irreversible corneal damage was observed in 2/6 eyes. The other 4 eyes had moderate to mild reversible corneal damage.(19) Application of a 10% solution of commercial tetrahydrofuran (unspecified peroxide content) caused slight redness of the cornea, which lasted 20 minutes. A 20% solution caused redness of the eyelids, with corneal opacity and edema. A 50% solution caused these effects more severely, with slight signs remaining after one week.(21) Rats exposed to 5000 ppm tetrahydrofuran (tetrahydrofuran) for 3 hours had swelling and corneal opacity.(7)

Skin Irritation:

Water solutions containing greater than 20% tetrahydrofuran were irritating to the skin of rabbits.(6) There are no further details available.

Effects of Short-Term (Acute) Exposure:

Inhalation:
Concentrations higher than 3400 ppm, 8 hours daily for 20 days, caused anesthesia from which mice and dogs showed poor recovery. This was accompanied by a decrease in blood pressure and a stimulation in respiration. There was a small margin of safety between anesthesia and death of the animals. Animals that inhaled 3400 ppm, 3 hours daily for 30 days, experienced irritation of the mucous membranes, salivation and muscle spasms. Some animals had damage to the liver and kidneys. Animals exposed to lower concentrations (100-200 ppm for 3 hours) experienced redness of the nose and eyelids.(13)

Effects of Long-Term (Chronic) Exposure:

Inhalation:
Inhalation of 100-200 ppm (4-6 hr/day, 2-24 weeks) caused little toxic effect in rats.(3,4) Exposure to 2000 ppm for the same durations had little effect other than temporary central nervous system (CNS) depression and increased liver activity.(3,4) Rats and mice were exposed to 0, 66, 200, 600, 1800 and 5000 ppm for 14 weeks (6 hr/d; 5 d/wk). All rats survived and body weights were similar to controls. At 5000 ppm, 2 male mice died and one was killed due to severe toxicity. All female mice survived. The body weights of male mice were similar to controls and female mice exposed to 5000 ppm had increased body weights. Signs of CNS depression were seen in both rats (5000 ppm) and mice (1800 and 5000 ppm). In rats exposed to 5000 ppm, absolute and relative thymus and spleen weights were significantly less than controls. Absolute and relative liver weights were increased in female rats exposed to 5000 ppm, in male mice exposed to 600 ppm and greater and in female mice exposed to 1800 or 5000 ppm. An increased incidence of minimal to mild hyperplasia of the forestomach was observed in rats exposed to 5000 ppm. Signs of liver damage (minimal to mild centrilobular cytomegaly) were observed in male and female mice exposed to 5000 ppm. Mild degeneration of the adrenal glands was observed in female mice exposed to 5000 ppm.(16,26) Rats and mice were exposed by inhalation to 0, 200, 600 or 1800 ppm tetrahydrofuran for 105 weeks (6 hrs/d; 5 d/wk). In rats, survival and mean body weights were similar to controls. No significant clinical findings or non-cancerous lesions related to THF exposure were observed in male or female rats. After week 36, the survival of male mice exposed to 1800 ppm was significantly reduced. Male mice in this exposure group experienced narcosis during and up to 1 hour following exposure. There were no effects on survival or mean body weight and no clinical findings or non-cancerous lesions in any other exposure group.(25,26) See "Carcinogenicity" below for further discussion of the results of this study.

Carcinogenicity:
In a National Toxicology Program study, rats and mice were exposed by inhalation to 0, 200, 600 or 1800 ppm tetrahydrofuran for 105 weeks (6 hrs/d; 5 d/wk). There was some evidence of carcinogenic activity in male rats based on increased incidences of renal tubule adenoma or carcinoma (combined; not statistically significant) at 600 and 1800 ppm. There was no evidence of carcinogenic activity in female rats or male mice. There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in female mice based on increased incidences of hepatocellular neoplasms at 1800 ppm.(25,26) Tetrahydrofuran applied to the skin of mice, twenty-five times over 17.5 months, gave no evidence of carcinogenicity.(7)

Teratogenicity, Embryotoxicity and/or Fetotoxicity:
Teratogenic and embryotoxic effects were not seen in rats or mice at doses that were not also maternally toxic.
Rats and mice were exposed by inhalation to up to 5000 ppm on days 6-19 (rats) or 6-17 (mice) of pregnancy. Maternal toxicity (reduced body weight) was observed at 5000 ppm in the rats. Maternal toxicity was observed at 1800 and 5000 ppm in mice (with deaths at 5000 ppm). Reduced fetal weight was seen in rats at 5000 ppm. There was a significant decrease in the number of live fetuses in mice exposed to 1800 or 5000 ppm. No effects were seen in either species at 600 ppm.(15) In a 2-generation study, rats were exposed continuously to 0, 1000, 3000 or 9000 ppm tetrahydrofuran in their drinking water for at least 70 days prior to and during mating, pregnancy, birthing, lactation and weaning through two successive generations. Approximate doses were 0, 100, 300, or 700 mg/kg/day for males and females premating; 0, 100, 300 or 800 mg/kg/day for females during pregnancy and 0, 200, 500 or 1300 mg/kg/day for females during lactation. Water consumption was reduced in both sexes and generations in a dose-related manner at all doses, with statistical significance at 3000 and 9000 ppm (F0) and 9000 ppm (F1). Food consumption was reduced in F0 females, F1 males and F1 females and body weights were reduced F0 males, F0 females and F1 males at 9000 ppm. Kidney weights were increased in F0 males exposed to 9000 ppm. At 9000 ppm, pup body weight gain was reduced during lactation in both generations and eye opening was delayed. There were no treatment-related malformations.(27)

Reproductive Toxicity:
No adverse effects on fertility or reproduction were observed in rats exposed to tetrahydrofuran in their drinking water for 2 generations.
In a 2-generation study, rats were exposed continuously to 0, 1000, 3000 or 9000 ppm tetrahydrofuran in their drinking water for at least 70 days prior to and during mating, pregnancy, birthing, lactation and weaning through two successive generations. Approximate doses were 0, 100, 300, or 700 mg/kg/day for males and females premating; 0, 100, 300 or 800 mg/kg/day for females during pregnancy and 0, 200, 500 or 1300 mg/kg/day for females during lactation. Water consumption was reduced in both sexes and generations in a dose-related manner at all doses, with statistical significance at 3000 and 9000 ppm (F0) and 9000 ppm (F1). Food consumption was reduced in F0 females, F1 males and F1 females and body weights were reduced F0 males, F0 females and F1 males at 9000 ppm. Kidney weights were increased in F0 males exposed to 9000 ppm. There were no adverse effects on fertility or reproduction.(27) Rats and mice were exposed to 0, 66, 200, 600, 1800 and 5000 ppm for 14 weeks (6 hr/d; 5 d/wk). Uterine atrophy was observed in all female mice exposed to 5000 ppm, but there was significant other toxicity observed at this exposure concentration.(26)

Mutagenicity:
The available information does not suggest that tetrahydrofuran is mutagenic.
Negative results (bone marrow micronuclei) were obtained for female mice exposed to by inhalation to up to 5000 ppm tetrahydrofuran for 14 weeks, while equivocal results (a small increase above baseline) were obtained for male mice.(26) Negative results (sister chromatid exchanges and chromosomal aberrations) were obtained in tests using male mice exposed by intraperitoneal injection.(26) This route of exposure is not considered relevant to occupational situations.
Negative results (sister chromatid exchanges, chromosomal aberrations) were obtained in tests using cultured mammalian cells, with and without metabolic activation.(26) Negative results (gene mutation) were also observed in bacteria, with and without metabolic activation.(26)
No increase in sex-linked recessive lethal mutations were detected in the germ cells of male fruit flies exposed by feeding or injection.(26)


SECTION 16. OTHER INFORMATION

Selected Bibliography:
(1) RTECS record for furan, tetrahydro-. Last updated 9404.
(2) Kimura, E.T., et al. Acute toxicity and limits of solvent residue for sixteen organic solvents. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. Vol. 19, no. 4 (Aug. 1971). p. 699-704
(3) Proceedings of the Tenth Asian Conference on Occupational Health, Sept. 5-10, 1982, Singapore. Vol. 2, ACOH, 1984. p. 793-798
(4) Elovaara, E., et al. Burden and biochemical effects of extended tetrahydrofuran vapour inhalation of three concentration levels. Acta pharmacol. et toxicol. Vol. 54, no. 3 (1984). p. 221-225
(5) Deichmann, W.B., et al. Toxicology of drugs and chemicals. Academic Press, 1969. p. 580, 247-248
(6) Documentation of the threshold limit values and biological exposure indices. 5th ed. ACGIH, 1986. p. 564
(7) HSDB record for tetrahydrofuran. Last updated 9403.
(8) Gosselin, R.E., et al. Clinical toxicology of commercial products. 5th ed. Williams & Wilkins, 1984. p. II-408
(9) Bretherick, L. Bretherick's handbook of reactive chemical hazards. 4th ed. Butterworths, 1990. p. 466-468, 1746-1750
(10) Fire protection guide to hazardous materials. 13th ed. Edited by A.B. Spencer, et al. National Fire Protection Association, 2002. NFPA 325; NFPA 49; NFPA 491
(11) Forsberg, K., et al. Quick selection guide to chemical protective clothing. 4th ed. Van Nostrand Reinhold, 2002
(12) Verschueren, K. Handbook of environmental data on organic chemicals. 2nd ed. Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1983. p. 1087-1088
(13) Tetrahydrofuran (hygienic guide series). Rev ed. American Industrial Hygiene Association, June 1980
(14) NIOSH pocket guide to chemical hazards. NIOSH, June 1994. p. 302-303
(15) Mast, T.J., et al. Evaluation of the potential for developmental toxicity in rats and mice following inhalation exposure to tetrahydrofuran. Fundamental and Applied Toxicology. Vol. 18 (1992). p. 255-265
(16) Chhabra, R.S., et al. Subchronic toxicity of tetrahydrofuran vapors in rats and mice. Fundamental and Applied Toxicology. Vol. 14 (1990). p. 338-345
(17) European Economic Community. Commission Directive 93/72/EEC. Sept. 1, 1993
(18) Sigma-Aldrich Canada Ltd. URL: http://www.sigma-aldrich.com/saws/nsf/Technical+Library?OpenFrameset
(19) Haskell Laboratory. Rabbit eye irritation study of furan, tetrahydro- and furan, tetrahydro-/cyclohexanone (A) (85:15) with cover letter dated 05/10/94 (Sanitized). Date produced: Sept. 1971. E.I. DuPont De Nemours & Co. EPA/OTS 86940000742S. NTIS/OTS0557152.
(20) Consumer Product Testing Co. Primary dermal irritation (rabbit), ocular irritation (rabbit), and oral LD50 (rat) Studies of tetrahydrofuran (Sample #7427-f), with cover letter dated 05/09/94. Date produced: Dec. 1978. International Speciality Products. EPA/OTS 86940000954. NTIS/OTS0557364.
(21) Jochmann, 1961. Zur Frage der Schadigung von Leber und Niere durch tetrahydrofuran. [German]. Arch. f. Gewerbepath. U. Gewerbehyg. Vol. 18, no. 6 (1961). p. 698-717. English abstract available in: The problem of injury to the liver and kidneys by tetrahydrofuran. Bulletin of Hygiene (Occupational Health Abstracts). Vol. 37, no. 6 (1962). p. 565 (translated by E. Browning)
(22) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Tetrahydrofuran. In: Safety and Health Topics. Available at <www.osha-slc.gov/dts/chemicalsampling/data/CH_271000.html>
(23) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Organic Vapors. In: OSHA Analytical Methods Manual. Revision Date: Oct. 31, 2001. Available at: <www.osha-slc.gov/dts/sltc/methods/toc.html>
(24) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Tetrahydrofuran. In: NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods (NMAM(R)). 4th ed. Edited by M.E. Cassinelli, et al. DHHS (NIOSH) Publication 94-113. Aug. 1994. Available at: <www.cdc.gov/niosh/nmam/nmammenu.html>
(25) Chhabra, R.S., et al. Carcinogenesis studies of tetrahydrofuran vapors in rats and mice. Toxicological Sciences. Vol. 41, no. 2 (1998). p. 183-188
(26) National Toxicology Program (NTP). Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of tetrahydrofuran (CAS No. 109-99-9) in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice (inhalation studies). NTP TR 475. US Department of Health and Human Services, June 1998
(27) Hellwig, J., et al. Tetrahydrofuran : two-generation reproduction toxicity in Wistar rats by continuous administration in the drinking water. Food and Chemical Toxicology. Vol. 40, no. 10 (2002). p. 1515-1523
(28) Tetrahydrofuran. In: Documentation of threshold limit values and biological exposure indices. 7th ed. (Suppl.). American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, 2005

Information on chemicals reviewed in the CHEMINFO database is drawn from a number of publicly available sources. A list of general references used to compile CHEMINFO records is available in the database Help.


Review/Preparation Date: 1995-02-07

Revision Indicators:
EU class 1996-02-01
EU risk 1996-02-01
EU safety 1996-02-01
EU comments 1996-02-01
Respiratory guidelines 1997-12-01
US transport 1998-03-01
Resistance of materials 1998-06-01
WHMIS classification comments 2003-05-25
Short-term eye contact 2003-09-19
Short-term skin contact 2003-09-24
Composition/purity 2003-10-03
Handling 2003-10-03
Extinguishing media 2003-10-03
Stability 2003-10-03
Storage 2003-10-03
PEL-TWA final 2003-10-14
PEL-STEL final 2003-10-14
PEL-TWA transitional 2003-10-14
PEL transitional comments 2003-10-14
TLV definitions 2004-07-04
Passive Sampling Devices 2005-03-14
Sampling/analysis 2005-03-14
TLV-TWA 2005-03-24
TLV-STEL 2005-03-24
TLV proposed changes 2005-03-24
TLV basis 2005-03-25
Toxicological info 2005-03-31
Carcinogenicity 2005-03-31
Teratogenicity/embryotoxicity 2005-03-31
Reproductive toxicity 2005-03-31
Mutagenicity 2005-03-31
WHMIS detailed classification 2005-03-31
Bibliography 2005-03-31
ERPG-1 2005-07-01
ERPG-2 2005-07-01
ERPG-3 2005-07-01



©2007 Canadian  Centre  for  Occupational  Health  &  Safety  
www.ccohs.ca  E-mail: clientservices@ccohs.ca  Fax: (905) 572-2206  Phone: (905) 572-2981  
Mail:  250  Main  Street  East,  Hamilton  Ontario  L8N  1H6